adolescence

On Cyberbullying, interesting short review

A study by Gustavo S. Mesch indicates that adolescents vary in their willingness to share personal information online. It is determined, however, that most youth lack the ability to determine when one should withhold such information and cease communicating with strangers on the Internet (Mesch, p. 391). Though parents seek to teach their children about relationships and the importance of such values as “trust” and “honesty,” our world of ever-emerging communication technologies may cause the need to reevaluate these principles. The question remains: How can parents properly shelter their children from such threats when friends meet on the Internet?

http://media.www.mediaethicsmagazine.com/media/storage/paper655/news/2011/07/01/AnalysesCommentary/Cyberbullying.Beyond.The.Playground.Educating.Youth.About.Potential.Harms.Of.Com-3998372.shtml&sourcedomain=www.mediaethicsmagazine.com&facebook

Midwest book review on Wired Youth (2010) Mesch & Talmud

Most Helpful Customer Reviews 5.0 out of 5 stars

A work of impressive and painstaking scholarship, September 9, 2010 By Midwest Book Review (Oregon, WI USA) – .Wired Youth: The Social World of Adolescence in the Information Age (Adolescence and Society Series) (Paperback) The latest addition to the outstanding ‘Adolescence and Society’ series from Routledge, “Wired Youth: The Social World of Adolescence in the Information Age” is the collaborative work of Gustavo S. Mesch (Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Haifa) and Ilan Talmud (Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Haifa). This 184-page compendium presents a seminal introduction and description of the literature on youth sociability and relationship formation in this era of personal electronic communications. Of special interest is the attention paid to the negative and positive consequences of adolescent usage (and contemporary dependence upon) online communication. A work of impressive and painstaking scholarship, enhanced with twenty pages of references and a comprehensive index, “Wired Youth” is a strongly recommended addition to academic library Contemporary Sociology reference collections and supplemental reading lists.

Wired Youth (2010) Mesch & Talmud

The Prevention Researcher,
Volume 17, Number 5, 2010, Pages 17
http://www.tpronline.org/book-review.cfm/Wired_Youth

“thought-provoking discussions about the fundamental nature of internet-based social interaction.” 

The Prevention Researcher is a quarterly journal that uses a straightforward and easy-to-read approach to present the most current research and developments in adolescent behavioral research.

Reviewed by John de Miranda, Ed.M.
 Part of the series “Adolescence and Society” published by Routledge, Wired Youth: The Social World of Adolescence in the Information Age is aimed at undergraduates in education and the social sciences, as well as professionals in the same fields. The reviewer, John de Miranda, found that the authors (Gustavo Mesch and Ilan Talmud) present “thought-provoking discussions about the fundamental nature of internet-based social interaction.”

Contemporary Sociology, March 2011 Issue

Wired Youth: The Social World of Adolescence in the Information Age

Wired Youth: The Social World of Adolescence in the Information Age, by Gustavo S. Mesch, Ilan Talmud . New York, NY: Routledge, 2010. $34.95 paper. 176pp. ISBN: 9780415459945.

This book provides a broad interdisciplinary review of literature on youth involvement with digital social technologies. The authors consider research and theory from the perspectives of technological determinism and social constructivism. Although drawing conclusions from both, they ultimately take a sociological approach, viewing digital socializing as an embedded feature of the social structure. They are optimistic about the effects on young people of digital social technologies such as the Internet and cell phones, noting that online social networks tend to increase friendship networks for both introverted and extroverted youth. The highest Internet users tend to be the most social, even when off the Internet. The authors also consider the dangers, including findings that connect Internet use and decreased well-being for introverted youth. Cyberbullying, the act of bullying through online communications such as Instant Messengers, or social networking sites such as Facebook, is on the rise and appears to be magnifying traditional instances of bullying within schools. They also report that youth who use the Internet for socializing tend to spend less time with their families and more time with peer groups. This suggests new technologies may be giving peer groups more influence over youth, which may be a concern for some parents. The authors cover a lot of ground, making this a valuable resource for those interested in examining the prevailing research into digital social technologies and their effect on youth culture. ֲ© American Sociologi cal Association 2011